Sarcodon imbricati in a dense group

Sarcodon imbricatus

Sarcodon imbricatus, commonly known as the shingled hedgehog or scaly hedgehog, is a species of tooth fungus in the order Thelephorales. The mushroom itself is edible. Many sources report it has a bitter taste, but others have found it delicious and suspect that the bitter specimens may be similar related species. The mushroom has a large, brownish cap with large brown scales and may reach 30 cm in diameter. On the underside it sports greyish brittle teeth instead of gills, and has white flesh. The spore print is brown. It is associated with spruce (Abies), appearing in autumn. It ranges throughout North America and Europe, although collections from the British Isles are now assigned to another species.

From above, it may be confused with the old man of the woods (Strobilomyces strobilaceus) as both have a similar shaggy cap. The bitter and inedible Sarcodon amarascens can be distinguished by its bluish-black stipe.

They grow in association with spruce (Abies), especially in hilly or mountainous areas, and can appear on sandy or chalk soils in fairy rings. The usual fruiting season in August to October. It ranges throughout North America and Europe, although collections from the British Isles are now assigned to another species, Sarcodon squamosus.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcodon_imbricatus - 23.10.2008

Sarcodon imbricatus

The Sarcodon imbricatus observed individually is already screamingly because of its design,
but in a group these mushrooms are still more extraordinary.

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