Fly Agarics in different age.

Fly Agaric

Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the Fly Agaric is a poisonous and pschoactive basidiomycete fungus, one of many in the genus Amanita. Native throughout the temperate and boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere, the Fly Agaric has been unintentionally introduced to many countries in the Southern Hemisphere, generally as a symbiont with pine plantations, and is now a true cosmopolitan species. It associates with various deciduous and coniferous trees. The quintessential toadstool, it is a large white-gilled, white-spotted, usually deep red mushroom, one of the most recognizable and widely encountered in popular culture.

The Fly Agaric is a cosmopolitan mushroom, native to conifer and deciduous woodlands throughout the temperate and boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including high elevations of warmer latitudes in regions like the Hindu Kush, the Mediterranean and Central America. Though generally encountered in autumn, the season can vary in different climates: fruiting occurs in summer and autumn across most of North America, but later in autumn and early winter on the Pacific coast.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria - 15.06.2010

Fly Agarics

Whether mushrooms, animals or men, what a close principle of life and growth:

At first small and rounded, then upcoming and developing, finally big, with distinctive forms.

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